Former PayPal CEO to launch digital bank Nirvana in Miami – and its hiring

By Riley Kaminer

Nirvana CEO Bill Harris says he plans to hire 200 people by the end of 2022

Former PayPal and Intuit CEO Bill Harris announced today that he has moved to Miami to launch Nirvana Technology, a global digital bank. The serial entrepreneur plans to base the startup in Wynwood, and he is already hiring.

“We’re bringing the fire of Silicon Valley – innovation, ambition and mission – to the new Silicon Beach,” Harris said in a statement. 

Nirvana reports that they are hiring for talent across engineering, product, marketing, and operations roles. “We’ll employ 50 people by year end and 200 by the following year,” said Harris. “Recruiting an exceptional team is the fuel for hyper-growth.”

Harris claims that the startup is “fully funded” and actively hiring “a diverse and talented team.”

His message to ambitious members of the Miami tech ecosystem? “If you want to make a difference in people’s lives, please join us.” Harris calls Nirvana “a unique opportunity to get in on the ground floor of a consumer-facing financial tech company that, if we’re successful, will be a hyper-growth startup.” He said that all new staff members at all levels of seniority will have options in the business. 

A list of open positions is available on the careers page of Nirvana’s website. Roles include senior positions like Director of Banking Operations and Director of Engineering, as well as junior positions for recent graduates that are looking for software engineering roles. 

The FinTech’s goal is to develop “digital financial tools to balance money and life.” Nirvana hopes to disrupt the scandal-ridden traditional consumer banking industry. They’re tapping into a perfect storm: millennials’ increasing skepticism around the legacy banks and the generation’s increasing spending power

Harris calls Nirvana a challenger credit card provider rather than a challenger bank. “We’re focused on creating a better credit card.” He said that “challenger banks have been the big story for the last five years,” but challenger credit card providers are on track to be the next disruptive force in the consumer FinTech space.

The startup aims to be “a relief valve for the stress caused by money ... the deadlines and obligations,” offering its consumers a way to “find a healthy balance” in their life. Harris told Refresh Miami that Nirvana will “encourage people to use their money in a way that brings greater satisfaction.”

According to their website, Nirvana plans to launch this winter.

Harris is one of the higher profile FinTech executives to hop onto the Miami FinTech trend. Refresh Miami reported that small business-focused challenger bank Novo is shifting operations from New York to the Magic City. Fortú, a new bank focused on un- and under-banked Hispanic consumers also recently announced Miami as the location of its corporate headquarters.

He's also one of the latest executives to announce significant tech hiring plans for Miami. Two weeks ago, Globant announced it would be adding 150 to its team of 90  in Miami, following  new hiring announcements from Zumper and from Blackstone.

In his 25 years in Silicon Valley, Harris founded eight successful FinTech and cybersecurity startups including San Francisco-based consumer banking startup One. But Harris is excited about the opportunities present in the South Florida tech ecosystem, noting our region’s comparatively modest average housing cost compared to Silicon Valley.

While Harris highlighted that the Silicon Valley talent pool is larger than South Florida’s, he said the “demand for talent is even bigger than that.”

“There’s less supply of tech talent here but fewer people fighting for that talent,” Harris said. “We think that we will become one of the best places for talent in the Miami area.”

This post has been updated. Photos provided by Nirvana.

READ MORE ON REFRESH

Globant to add 150 tech jobs in Miami and the CEO shares the details

Where the jobs are: a closer look at Blackstone’s hiring plans

Zumper jumps at opportunity to open hub in Miami

 

Riley Kaminer